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National Parks Today

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10 minutes ago

Yellowstone seeks comments on proposed development of seasonal housing for park concessionaires. Details at nps.gov/yell/learn/news/19016.htm ... See MoreSee Less

Yellowstone seeks comments on proposed development of seasonal housing for park concessionaires. Details at nps.gov/yell/learn/news/19016.htm

 

Comment on Facebook

my last visit was 1983

Algún día iré a ese lugar hermoso

ok

👊

21 minutes ago

Prescribed burn today in the Pinnacles area of the park. Heavy smoke is possible and reduced visibility on Hwy 240 and Sage Creek Rim Road are possible. Delays may be expected.

Until recent times, fire was a natural part of life here on the prairie. Fire is a natural occurrence and is essential for the maintenance of the ecosystem. Fire helps control weeds and other invasive species, returns nutrients to the soil, and helps remove excess fuel load to lessen the chance of a natural occurring wildfire devastating the area.

A prescribed fire is a calculated and carefully planned event. Fire managers construct a fire plan that considers elements such as wind conditions, weather, season, humidity, the amount of moisture in the dead vegetation, and the quantity and availability of fuel (natural build up of leaf litter and woody growth). As part of the plan, fire managers determine how hot the fire will burn and in what direction it will travel. Using that information, managers carefully station each member of the fire crew so that the fire site is well managed and the crew is safe. A fire plan includes precautions to prevent the fire from becoming an uncontrolled wildfire. In addition, a fire plan specifies emergency procedures to handle an uncontrolled fire, should it become necessary.

Since a prescribed fire moves at only 0.1 to 1.6 mile per hour, most animals can move out of it’s way if needed. For example, burrowing animals, who by instinct will seek refuge underground, find safety since high temperatures from a prescribed fire only penetrate one to two inches into the soil.
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Prescribed burn today in the Pinnacles area of the park. Heavy smoke is possible and reduced visibility on Hwy 240 and Sage Creek Rim Road are possible. Delays may be expected. 
Until recent times, fire was a natural part of life here on the prairie. Fire is a natural occurrence and is essential for the maintenance of the ecosystem. Fire helps control weeds and other invasive species, returns nutrients to the soil, and helps remove excess fuel load to lessen the chance of a natural occurring wildfire devastating the area.
A prescribed fire is a calculated and carefully planned event. Fire managers construct a fire plan that considers elements such as wind conditions, weather, season, humidity, the amount of moisture in the dead vegetation, and the quantity and availability of fuel (natural build up of leaf litter and woody growth). As part of the plan, fire managers determine how hot the fire will burn and in what direction it will travel. Using that information, managers carefully station each member of the fire crew so that the fire site is well managed and the crew is safe. A fire plan includes precautions to prevent the fire from becoming an uncontrolled wildfire. In addition, a fire plan specifies emergency procedures to handle an uncontrolled fire, should it become necessary. 
Since a prescribed fire moves at only 0.1 to 1.6 mile per hour, most animals can move out of it’s way if needed. For example, burrowing animals, who by instinct will seek refuge underground, find safety since high temperatures from a prescribed fire only penetrate one to two inches into the soil.Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

Very true, which makes me wonder why this is not practiced in all National Parks?

26 minutes ago

Researcher studying ancient petroglyphs in the 1980s. (hl) #TBT #ThrowbackThursday #history #archeology #parkchat #PetrifiedForest #NPS ... See MoreSee Less

Researcher studying ancient petroglyphs in the 1980s. (hl) #TBT #ThrowbackThursday #history #archeology #parkchat #PetrifiedForest #NPS

1 hour ago

Local climbers volunteered their time to assist park biologists with peregrine falcon monitoring and managed to locate unknown falcon nests. This allowed park staff to reopen unoccupied cliffs to rock climbing earlier than normal. Every season from March to late July the park closes certain cliffs to climbing to protect nesting peregrine falcons who may abandon their nest if disturbed. This cooperative effort is a great example of local conservation-minded climbers volunteering to protect wildlife while also helping reopen climbing access in the park. Thanks to their efforts, Mountain of the Sun, The Sentinel, East Temple, Mount Spry, The Streaked Wall, and North Twin Brother are now reopened to rock climbing.

To get current information about rock climbing in the park, including maps of areas still closed, go to our park website: www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/climbing.htm
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Local climbers volunteered their time to assist park biologists with peregrine falcon monitoring and managed to locate unknown falcon nests. This allowed park staff to reopen unoccupied cliffs to rock climbing earlier than normal. Every season from March to late July the park closes certain cliffs to climbing to protect nesting peregrine falcons who may abandon their nest if disturbed. This cooperative effort is a great example of local conservation-minded climbers volunteering to protect wildlife while also helping reopen climbing access in the park. Thanks to their efforts, Mountain of the Sun, The Sentinel, East Temple, Mount Spry, The Streaked Wall, and North Twin Brother are now reopened to rock climbing.
To get current information about rock climbing in the park, including maps of areas still closed, go to our park website: https://www.nps.gov/zion/planyourvisit/climbing.htmImage attachmentImage attachment

 

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Dylan Berger

2 hours ago

THROWBACK THURSDAY
The Buckstaff Bathhouse is up next on our #bathhouserowstroll this #throwbackthursday!

A total of three bathhouses previously occupied the site of the present day Buckstaff Bathhouse. A brick bathhouse allegedly existed on the site in the late 1850s. The A.B. Gaines Bathhouse occupied the site until it was burned down in the 1878 fire. Following the fire, the Rammelsberg Bathhouse (pictured in the first photo), a brick Victorian structure, was built to replace the burned bathhouse. The Rammelsberg operated until 1911 when the Department of the Interior required it to be replaced with a new fireproof and more sanitary building. The Buckstaff Bathhouse (pictured in the second photo) opened on February 1, 1912, replacing the Rammelsberg. Named for controlling shareholders George and Milo Buckstaff, the bathhouse cost $125,000 to build. The structure is neoclassical revival in style, with imposing Doric columns and urns. As one of the nicer bathhouses on the Row, the Buckstaff included a hydrotherapy department, music room, gymnasium, and roof garden.

Check back tomorrow to learn about the Buckstaff Bathhouse’s present day uses!

#historicpreservationmonth

NPS Photos
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THROWBACK THURSDAY
The Buckstaff Bathhouse is up next on our #bathhouserowstroll this #throwbackthursday!
A total of three bathhouses previously occupied the site of the present day Buckstaff Bathhouse. A brick bathhouse allegedly existed on the site in the late 1850s. The A.B. Gaines Bathhouse occupied the site until it was burned down in the 1878 fire. Following the fire, the Rammelsberg Bathhouse (pictured in the first photo), a brick Victorian structure, was built to replace the burned bathhouse. The Rammelsberg operated until 1911 when the Department of the Interior required it to be replaced with a new fireproof and more sanitary building. The Buckstaff Bathhouse (pictured in the second photo) opened on February 1, 1912, replacing the Rammelsberg. Named for controlling shareholders George and Milo Buckstaff, the bathhouse cost $125,000 to build. The structure  is neoclassical revival in style, with imposing Doric columns and urns. As one of the nicer bathhouses on the Row, the Buckstaff included a hydrotherapy department, music room, gymnasium, and roof garden.
Check back tomorrow to learn about the Buckstaff Bathhouse’s present day uses!
#historicpreservationmonth
NPS PhotosImage attachment

11 hours ago

Some say, "There's not much here other than rocks!"

If there's "nothing" here, why do YOU visit Grand Canyon?
#LetUsKnow #ThursdayThoughts #GrandCanyon

Geology talks:
South Rim: 2 pm daily, Yavapai Geology Museum
North Rim 10:30 am daily, Grand Canyon Lodge Veranda

Description: at the base of a limestone cliff on the left, a long ridgeline of vermilion colored stone extends out into the landscape, and finally merges into a butte with a pointed sandstone top. In the background, colorful cliffs and peaks continue to the distant horizon. (View from Widfross Point Trail on the North Rim of the park. Photo/S. Bridgehouse.) -mq
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Some say, Theres not much here other than rocks! 
If theres nothing here, why do YOU visit Grand Canyon? 
#LetUsKnow #ThursdayThoughts  #GrandCanyon 
Geology talks:
South Rim: 2 pm daily, Yavapai Geology Museum
North Rim  10:30 am daily, Grand Canyon Lodge Veranda
Description: at the base of a limestone cliff on the left, a long ridgeline of vermilion colored stone extends out into the landscape, and finally merges into a butte with a pointed sandstone top. In the background, colorful cliffs and peaks continue to the distant horizon. (View from Widfross Point Trail on the North Rim of the park. Photo/S. Bridgehouse.) -mq

 

Comment on Facebook

I love the beauty. I go usually on a solo trip to visit the canyon.

Wild life

To get my spiritual batteries filled.

One of the most breathtaking scenes God made.

To feel small / insignificant and grand / courageous all at the same time as I hike rim to rim.

It's awe inspiring!

I like rocks!

We visited because we like rocks, Loved these! 😉

Solitude and a reminder of how we are just a small piece in the beauty and wonder of this planet

The history...both from a geological standpoint and from the people brave enough to have lived on the land and explored the canyon/river. It's truly humbling and inspiring.

So, we will be there soon. My 22-yr old son is coming. He’s got my heart disease HOCM, just finding out it has increased in severity. So any walks are out. Where would the best places to go that are close to the parking? The altitude changes are bad, moderate effort up & down could be too much of a strain. We will be starting at the Hoover Dam, working to the south rim & up to the north rim.

It's my favorite most beautiful special place to refill my spirit.

Isn't a canyon basically a lack of rocks? We go to celebrate how beautiful the hole in the ground is! 😉

Yair Jasso 📌

I went for the rocks! Damn beautiful rocks too.

Magical

It’s overwhelming! It’s awesome! It’s spiritual! It’s breathtaking! It’s gorgeous!

Beautiful.

Magnificent beauty!

The Mule rides !

Rafting, the grandeur of history and geology, the condors flying high overhead at sunset, the space, the sky.

Watching the cool rocks change shades of color as getting hit by different angles of light throughout the day.

It’s not about the rocks it’s about the awe inspiring feeling you get when you see it for the first time in person. To say being at a loss for words is an understatement.

So spectacular and a wonderful reminder of our awesome Creator. The splendor of God is all around us. All one must do is look

It fills me with awe every time I visit!

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13 hours ago

We need your help! Do you have any interior photos of this building from when it was a Chinese laundry (before its current use as a carriage shop)? We're planning to incorporate this building into the Pioneer Yosemite History Center in Wawona. (This building is just down the street from the history center, where it will remain.)

Photos of the interior of this building—or any Chinese laundry in California from the late 1800s or early 1900s—will be helpful as we restore the building in preparation for opening it to the public. Please send photos to yose_archives@nps.gov.

Thanks to Yosemite Conservancy and its generous donors for their support of this project, which will help us tell the story of the many Chinese laborers who were an integral in Yosemite's history. Learn more about the project at www.yosemiteconservancy.org/cultural-historic/expand-education-pioneer-history-center-2019.

#AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth #APAHeritageMonth
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We need your help! Do you have any interior photos of this building from when it was a Chinese laundry (before its current use as a carriage shop)? Were planning to incorporate this building into the Pioneer Yosemite History Center in Wawona. (This building is just down the street from the history center, where it will remain.)
Photos of the interior of this building—or any Chinese laundry in California from the late 1800s or early 1900s—will be helpful as we restore the building in preparation for opening it to the public. Please send photos to yose_archives@nps.gov.
Thanks to Yosemite Conservancy and its generous donors for their support of this project, which will help us tell the story of the many Chinese laborers who were an integral in Yosemites history. Learn more about the project at https://www.yosemiteconservancy.org/cultural-historic/expand-education-pioneer-history-center-2019.
#AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth  #APAHeritageMonth

 

Comment on Facebook

Hooray. Great idea

https://www.google.com/search?q=vintage+photo+of+chinese+laundry+california&client=safari&tbm=isch&tbs=rimg:CatyYTDEQkx7Ijg2izN8awXp2Z0DZELiy_1iJdKUzV1bWcoLa_13ti0rUf6dM8fQXM3iS7MEFm_1ejijrvzdC685L0aYyoSCTaLM3xrBenZETKnACQbcPhXKhIJnQNkQuLL-IkRkrP1TuyjSXgqEgl0pTNXVtZyghHsmnVDjnpUuioSCdr_1e2LStR_1pEYv6Fsd0zlS3KhIJ0zx9BczeJLsR8RLaQp7GCJ8qEgkwQWb96OKOuxGC-U3MgpuA9yoSCfN0LrzkvRpjEVKC56cEB9Tl&tbo=u&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjU143jvJ_iAhUGKawKHaa4BJUQ9C96BAgBEBs&biw=1074&bih=814&dpr=1

Maybe the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco might have some photos?

Here’s a link to a 1910 Chinese laundry picture from the California State Archives http://immigrationtounitedstates.org/426-chinese-laundries.html

What an exciting project!!!

Check with Angles Island. The Chinese were housed there. Or the ​Wing Luke Museum.

Shared to Yosemite Photography page..

Been there

Love it

Tom Bopp might?

Wesley Hogan

Bill George

What is a “Chinese laundry”?

Todd Yan Duyen Vu ASA cool stuff

Junior Coelho,can you help them?

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13 hours ago

Crossing Grand Canyon this month? To pass someone - slow down - let them know you want to pass. Why? go.nps.gov/GCTC05
-mq #LNT #Running #Hiking #Backpacking #GrandCanyon

[Image description: On the left, six day hikers spread out across the width of an uphill trail. On the right an insert showing two runners on a trail.]
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Crossing Grand Canyon this month? To pass someone - slow down - let them know you want to pass.  Why? https://go.nps.gov/GCTC05 
-mq #LNT #Running #Hiking #Backpacking #GrandCanyon
[Image description: On the left, six day hikers spread out across the width of an uphill trail. On the right an insert showing two runners on a trail.]

 

Comment on Facebook

And yield to uphill hikers please! They are working against gravity and need to maintain momentum!

🤣😂

Is it that crowded ? Yikes

But how can we expect the runners to maintain their sense of elitism if they have to be courteous to everyone?

14 hours ago

Today is Peace Officers Memorial Day, part of National Police Week. During this week, we give thanks to officers across the nation who serve our communities, including Park Rangers. Today, we honor the memory of those officers who gave their lives in the line of duty, and express our deepest gratitude to their surviving families. Many were officers of the National Park Service. Today, we stand with our peers in honoring these brave men and women not only in the National Park Service, but all law enforcement agencies across the nation. Thank you! ... See MoreSee Less

Today is Peace Officers Memorial Day, part of National Police Week. During this week, we give thanks to officers across the nation who serve our communities, including Park Rangers. Today, we honor the memory of those officers who gave their lives in the line of duty, and express our deepest gratitude to their surviving families. Many were officers of the National Park Service. Today, we stand with our peers in honoring these brave men and women not only in the National Park Service, but all law enforcement agencies across the nation. Thank you!

 

Comment on Facebook

Thank you!

Thank you so much for all your hard work and dedication to your job and this beautiful park.

Thank you for being there for the public!

Yes, thank you for your service. I think I even recognize couple of those faces.

Thanks

Thank You!!!

Thank you and be safe!!

Protection and blessings to them all

Bravo!!! As a VIP we very much appreciate you!

Thank you!!

🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🌎🌎🌎

Thank you!! 💗😊

I served for nearly 30 years. Thank you for your post

Thank you! 🇺🇸

🖤🖤💙🖤🖤

👍

Bicycling?

Love the pose of the 3 on the left!! lol!

5, 6, 7, 8.... Oh and I love you guys!!!

Thank you for all you do!

Thank You for Your Service and God Bless.

So appreciative of all you do for this amazing park and everyone who visits it. Thank you!

Indeed, thanks to all.

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14 hours ago

Landscape Language

Brume (noun) – mist, fog

Earlier this month brought the sun, but the brume is back this week. Brume, or mist, is an integral part of Pacific Northwest environments. It is the combination of sun and rain that create the park’s dense forests. Without one or the other, Mount Rainier would be a very different place.

NPS Photo of Eagle Peak, 5/14/19. ~kl
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Landscape Language
Brume (noun) – mist, fog
Earlier this month brought the sun, but the brume is back this week. Brume, or mist, is an integral part of Pacific Northwest environments. It is the combination of sun and rain that create the park’s dense forests. Without one or the other, Mount Rainier would be a very different place. 
NPS Photo of Eagle Peak, 5/14/19. ~kl

 

Comment on Facebook

Bradley Isakson

Love "brume"! <3

Travis Bealer

Olympic National Park shared a post.
Olympic National Park

15 hours ago

In honor of Police Week and Peace Officers Memorial Day, we recognize the rangers who protect people and resources here at Olympic and throughout the service. We are mindful of your dedication and your courage in the face of danger. Thank you.It's #NationalPoliceWeek and we want to thank officers across the nation who serve our communities, including park rangers and U.S Park Police in America's national parks. There are approximately 2,300 National Park Service Law Enforcement rangers and United States Park Police officers responsible for securing and protecting more than 84 million acres across 419 National Park Service locations. Image: National Park Service law enforcement officers laying a wreath for fallen officers at a memorial service in Washington, D.C. DOI/Tami Heilemann ... See MoreSee Less

In honor of Police Week and Peace Officers Memorial Day, we recognize the rangers who protect people and resources here at Olympic and throughout the service. We are mindful of your dedication and your courage in the face of danger. Thank you.

 

Comment on Facebook

Kudos for the good guys!

Thank you OLYM for recognizing these hard working Law Enforcement Rangers who go above and beyond every day. It would be nice to see more posts dedicated to the hard work they do around the park. Thank you LE Rangers! 💚🖤💚🖤

I salute my Daughter-in-Law for her service to the National Park Service as a Law Enforcement Officer.

Thank you.

Thank You...

Police Week. LMFAO.

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16 hours ago

Summer is almost here! Regularly scheduled programs start this Saturday the 18th. Join in and learn about geology, history, nature, the night sky, and more. ... See MoreSee Less

Summer is almost here! Regularly scheduled programs start this Saturday the 18th. Join in and learn about geology, history, nature, the night sky, and more.

 

Comment on Facebook

Will these still be offered in the beginning of September?

One of the drawbacks of visiting in the off-season; you miss these. But a visit anytime is worth it.

I imagine the "full moon" walk is only during the full moons? I think the full moon is June 17th and I won't be there until the 21st. :(

I wish there was still campfire programs

Excited to visit next week!

Love this park

Jason Chandler Joseph Casteel

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16 hours ago

Zooming in on the Colorado Plateau: Many of us are drawn to our National Parks for the big scenery, but sometimes the little things within each place can be equally awe-inspiring. This summer, we'll be celebrating some of the minute wonders of the Colorado Plateau, beginning with the ground beneath our feet! It can seem like there is a dearth of life in this arid region, but in reality, life can be found hiding almost everywhere. The ground across the Southwest US is alive with a collection of thousands of bacteria, fungi, moss and more that together are known are biological soil crusts. Sometimes these crusts are almost invisible, but other times they form a textured, colored surface across atop the soil. These crusts are critical to the health of this region, helping fix carbon and nitrogen, stabilize soils, capture moisture and seeds and more! Make sure to avoid stepping on soil crusts when possible as it can take decades or even centuries for developed crusts like the one below to form. Photo in Canyonlands National Park by Amy Washuta ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Don't tread on me.

Living dirt

I love crypto! (cryptogamic/cryptobiotic)! aka biological soil crust. Don't step on it, please!! It's alive and does such important stuff for the desert.

A picture showing a larger area of cryptobiotic soil in Canyonlands. Note how someone's footprints have destroyed where she/he walked.

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Rocky Mountain National Park added 3 new photos.
Rocky Mountain National Park

17 hours ago

Every year, Rocky Mountain National Park snowplow operators begin plowing Trail Ridge Road in mid-April. Trail Ridge Road is the highest continuous paved road in the United States - reaching 12,183 feet in elevation. Crews from the west side of the park and crews from the east side of the park move along the road and eventually meet near the Alpine Visitor Center. Park plow operators normally encounter drifts from 18 to 22 feet and are accustomed to plowing the same section of road over and over. Trail Ridge Road was completed in 1932. The earliest the road has opened was on May 7, 2002; the latest June 26, 1943. In 2011, the road opened on June 6.

Due to recent spring snowstorms park plow operators are experiencing significant drifts and snowpack at high elevations along the road. More snow is forecast for next week.Every year, Rocky Mountain National Park snowplow operators begin plowing Trail Ridge Road in mid-April. Trail Ridge Road is the highest continuous paved road in the United States - reaching 12,183 feet in elevation. Crews from the west side of the park and crews from the east side of the park move along the road and eventually meet near the Alpine Visitor Center. Park plow operators normally encounter drifts from 18 to 22 feet and are accustomed to plowing the same section of road over and over. Trail Ridge Road was completed in 1932. The earliest the road has opened was on May 7, 2002; the latest June 26, 1943. In 2011, the road opened on June 6. Due to recent spring snowstorms park plow operators are experiencing significant drifts and snowpack at high elevations along the road. More snow is forecast for next week.
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Every year, Rocky Mountain National Park snowplow operators begin plowing Trail Ridge Road in mid-April.  Trail Ridge Road is the highest continuous paved road in the United States - reaching 12,183 feet in elevation. Crews from the west side of the park and crews from the east side of the park move along the road and eventually meet near the Alpine Visitor Center.  Park plow operators normally encounter drifts from 18 to 22 feet and are accustomed to plowing the same section of road over and over.  Trail Ridge Road was completed in 1932.  The earliest the road has opened was on May 7, 2002; the latest June 26, 1943.  In 2011, the road opened on June 6.  
Due to recent spring snowstorms park plow operators are experiencing significant drifts and snowpack at high elevations along the road.  More snow is forecast for next week.Image attachmentImage attachment

 

Comment on Facebook

I've plowed I-70 up and down the mountains. I-70 and I-25 down town Denver. Hwy 93 out by Rocky Flats but I bet It would not compare to plowing Trail Ridge Road. I would love the chance to run that loader and plow trail Ridge Road some day. Talk about the best office window view in the state. Picture of that same loader and snow blower I took up at the visitors center on Trail Ridge Road 10 years ago.

That's awesome Thanks for sharing

Awesome you guys are amazing!

Trail Ridge Road was a beloved family favorite on some family road trips (from MN) in the 1960s. We have home movies and I still have Mom's souvenir, which held the milk for our cereal on the breakfast table for many years. 😊

Thanks for your hard work...and the pictures are awesome!!

Wow amazing pic love it up there

Wow! Incredible! One of my favorite drives.

Beautiful thank you for sharing.

Wow that is amazing!!!

Every year we down near the foothills and below listen for Trail Ridge Road reports. It is so high up that it is closed every winter. It's also gorgeous up there in the summer and fall!

It takes all kinds of people to make the world go round. NEvER will I go on that road again!!! Thankfully there are people that love it.

Not a job I would want. Beautiful pictures and thanks to the efforts of those who do this job!

Wow, it's still snowing there! We were there in the late summer, early fall. Beautiful, beautiful. If you haven't gone in person, do so. You won't regret it.

Thanks for the inspiration,what a wonderful place.

This was my dad’s favorite part of his job at RMNP in the 50’s and 60’s-plowing from the Grand Lake side-it was so exciting the day they broke through!

One of my favorite drives. It's Beautiful !

Thank you. You folks are amazing. It must be awesome to be the first ones up there!

Grateful to the workers who are preparing one of my favorite places in the world.

Best days on Trail Ridge Road? The handful of days before it opens to cars...

This is the most frightening road I've ever driven on even without the snow! Thanks for making this beautiful part of the world accessible.

Every year of my life, my family has waited and talked about when trail ridge will open! 65 years and I still listen with anticipation about when we might get to head up there!!! Love my home Colorado!

It looked amazing this morning blue skies deep snow we are so pleased we visited such a wonderful place

Brings back memories of my first trip out there to work at Trail Ridge Store in 1983.

This was May, 2014, Visitors Center on Trail Ridge Rd in Rocky.

That's neat been there several times love Estes park and I always thought the bear tooth range was higher probably pretty close to the same cooke city Montana is very beautiful too love high altitudes

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17 hours ago

Is Acadia part of your plans for Memorial Day, and beyond? Save time and skip lines by buying your entry pass online, and printing it for display before you get here. More at go.nps.gov/AcadiaPass ... See MoreSee Less

Is Acadia part of your plans for Memorial Day, and beyond? Save time and skip lines by buying your entry pass online, and printing it for display before you get here. More at http://go.nps.gov/AcadiaPass

 

Comment on Facebook

Scott remind me to do this

We are going to be there the 1st week of June and have the NPS Lifetime Senior Pass. Will we still need to display a pass on out dashboard? If so, should we or can we print the pass for our dashboard ahead of time and, if so, how do we do that without paying for a new pass?

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Latest Tweets

Yellowstone seeks comments on proposed development of seasonal housing for park concessionaires. Details at https://t.co/sKTqcIGwPR

Prescribed burn today in the Pinnacles area of the park. Heavy smoke is possible and reduced visibility on Hwy 240 and Sage Creek Rim Road are possible. Delays may be expected.

A Wind Advisory is in effect for northern Arizona on Thursday from
11 AM -7 PM MST. S-SW wind gusts 40- 55 mph expected. #azwx

Is Acadia part of your plans for Memorial Day, and beyond? Save time and skip lines by buying your entry pass online, and printing it for display before you get here. More at https://t.co/Wwznhvibog

Summer is almost here! Planning a visit to #GrandCanyon? Expect very crowded conditions. Arrive early (before 9 am) or later in the day (after 4 pm). Other helpful tips - https://t.co/yKDKcJJMP7 -mq #WednesdayWisdom #Arizona #Navigate #Congestion

The North Rim of Grand Canyon Opens Today, May 15, 2019! https://t.co/U1OdaKhqio Download North Rim Pocket Map: https://t.co/EoKS9Bv6xf Water availability on North Kaibab and Corridor Trails: https://t.co/yBte9P4Eat -mq #GrandCanyon #NorthRim #GrandCanyon100 #Arizona #R2R -mq

Summer is almost here! Regularly scheduled ranger programs start this Saturday the 18th. Join in and learn about geology, history, nature and more.

Joshua Tree: "Seussical: The National Park"
#PoorlyDescribeANationalPark

@JoshuaTreeNPS @StatueEllisNPS Tall woman waves torch at New York.

@JoshuaTreeNPS Craters of the Moon: Misnomer. Actually in Idaho.

Did you know? The pygmy nuthatch always roosts in groups and uses controlled hypothermia to withstand cold winter nights in RMNP. No other bird in North America uses this combination to survive winter. #Birds#Birding#rangertips#RMNP sd

Patrolling Bryce Canyon is all about people (and sometimes their little dogs, too).
Whether you’re injured, lost, locked out of your car, or hoping to take a photo with a flat hat, there’s a very good chance it will be Law Enforcement Officers that respond.

Concerned about threatened or endangered specie & their preservation as part of our natural world? Please come to #RMNP's Endangered Species Day Celebration at 7 pm Fri, May 17, Beaver Meadows Visitor Center. This special program celebrates endangered species success stories. ks

During National Police Week we'd like to give a special shout out to our very own law enforcement rangers here in Shenandoah National Park.

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